Commodity Update

Things You Should Know: week 43/2017

Apples
Large Granny Smith remain limited in Washington.

Citrus (Oranges)
Demand exceeds supplies.

Cucumbers (Eastern)
There is a wide range in quality on cucumbers in the south.

Eggplant (Eastern)
Production is going to slow down this week.

Lettuce Tender Leaf
Raw product has become a serious factor as poor quality acreage is resulting in a decrease in supplies. Some shippers have raised prices as a result.

Onions
Transportation is very limited.

Potatoes
Transportation very limited

Squash (Eastern)
Light Eastern supply

Transitions and Temperatures

Lettuce Iceberg
Huron began production on Monday.

Eggplant (Eastern)
Eggplant is transitioning to the Southeast.

Bell Peppers (Eastern)
Green Bell Pepper is transitioning to the southeast.

Berries (Blueberries)
Chilean fruit is expected to arrive mid November.

Berries (Strawberries)
Mexico is just starting harvest this week. We expect supplies to improve over the next 2-4 weeks. Santa Maria and Oxnard are increasing harvest.

Stone Fruit
Kiwi has started in California.

Melon (Cantaloupe)
The desert has started. We have a couple more weeks of harvesting in the San Joaquin Valley. Offshore lopes are set to arrive the first week or two of November.

Melon (Honeydew)
The desert has started. Offshore supplies are set to arrive during the middle to end of November.

A Peak at Peak Seasons

Squash (Eastern)
Squash is moving out of peak availability in the east.

Eggplant (Eastern)
Eggplant moving out of Peak availability.

Cucumbers (Eastern)
Cucumbers are moving out of peak season.

Bell Peppers (Eastern)
Green Bell Pepper is in Peak availability.

Berries (Blueberries)
Peru and Argentina are expected to be in peak harvest over the next 3-4 weeks.

Apples
Washington continues in the peak of its Gala and Golden delicious season.

Michigan is in the peak of its Gala, McIntosh, Jonathan, Empire, and Cortland seasons.

New York continues in the peak of its McIntosh, Empire, and Gala seasons.

Pears
Washington continues in the peak of its Bartlett pear season.

Potatoes (colored)
North Dakota, Wisconsin, Idaho, and western Washington continue in the peak of their red and gold potato seasons.

Stone Fruit
Peaches and nectarines will be finishing up over the next week to ten days.



Weather Update

There will be a brief cool down out west late this week, as a Pacific cold front approaches from the north. The system is expected to remain to the north with a slight chance of light rain possible late Thursday. High pressure builds on Friday ushering in an extended warming trend for the entire region. Gusty winds are forecast for the desert regions as the low passes to the north followed by a warming trend into late October. Central Mexico will see near to above average temperatures and mostly dry conditions through next week. In Florida typical light scattered showers mainly to the south are forecast in front of a more powerful system expected early next week. This system is forecast to bring up to 3 inches of rain, and strong winds on Monday into Tuesday followed by mostly dry conditions next week.

Freight Update

California trucks look to be steady for the balance of the week. Washington apple trucks are extremely tight with no relief in sight. Idaho onion/potato trucks remain extremely tight as well. The national average for diesel remained steady and is currently at 2.787 per gallon. An increase of .306 from this time last year. California prices are steady as well and are currently at 3.159 per gallon. Crude oil remained steady and is currently at 51.88 per barrel.

Apples Alert

California – Granny Smiths are still cleaning up with small fruit. Pink Ladies are steady, and they are heavier to the smaller sizing. The quality has been good for both.

Washington – Red Delicious are steady to lower on all sizes as more and more shippers start packing. The red sizing is normal with an 80/88/100 peak. Golden Delicious are steady with good availability. They are peaking on Premium grade 100/113s with only light supplies of 88s and larger. Granny Smiths are steady to slightly lower on all sizes. The fruit is still small so 88s and larger are limited, and they are priced at a premium. Galas are steady to slightly lower on 100s and smaller as they continue to peak on 113/125/138s. Fujis are steady to lower and are still peaking on 88/100s. Honeycrisps are slightly lower with more higher grade fruit peaking on 56/64/72/80s. A few Jonagolds have started, and they are large. A couple of suppliers also have Braeburns, and they are medium sized. The quality of all varieties has been good.

Idaho – Galas are steady and are still cleaning up. Jonathans are steady and peaking on 100 size and smaller. They have also started packing Jonagolds and golden delicious. The goldens are small with a 113-163 peak and the Jonagolds are large with a 72/80/88 peak. The quality has been good.

Michigan – Michigan continues to pack Galas, Honeycrisps, McIntosh, Jonathans, Jonamacs, Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, Cortlands, and Empires. They have also started with a few red Romes and Jonagolds. Most varieties have excellent quality and better than normal color. The Michigan markets are hanging steady and strong, but the harvest is finished so are seeing some price-flex on red delicious, golden delicious, and Galas. The quality has been good for all.

Pennsylvania – they continue packing Galas, Fujis, red delicious, and Golden Delicious and all markets are slightly lower. Honeycrisp have finished for the season. Red delicious are still peaking on 88/100s, while the rest are heavier to 100/113s. The quality has been good for all.

New York – they continue packing Cortlands, Galas, McIntosh, Honeycrisps, Red Delicious, Fujis, Snap Dragons, and Empires. They have started packing red Romes and Jonagolds. Most varieties are large and peaking on 88/100s with not much small fruit. There are a few small McIntosh. The quality has been good for all.

Alerts:
Large Granny Smith remain limited in Washington.

Peak Seasons:
Washington continues in the peak of its Gala and Golden delicious season.

Michigan is in the peak of its Gala, McIntosh, Jonathan, Empire, and Cortland seasons.

New York continues in the peak of its McIntosh, Empire, and Gala seasons.

Asparagus

Northern Baja (Ensenada) has started to close fields due to seasonality; quality is fair at best. Southern Baja still has decent volume but the warmer weather during the day and evening has decreased yields at the time of packing. Northern/Southern Peru are both in full production and are both having ideal growing weather. The overall market should improve next week with Northern Baja closing fields, and warmer than normal weather in Southern Baja.

Avocado (Mexican)

Mexico's shipments to the US started to slow the end of last week. Growers are looking to hold current field prices and not accepting offers of lower prices for their fruit. Market is reacting with slightly higher pricing. Shippers still have good supplies on hand, and expected Mexico to start to increase shipments as market firms.

Bell Peppers (Eastern)

There is a sloppy Bell Pepper market in the east. Michigan, New Jersey and western North Carolina are finishing for the season and flushing out what is left in fields. South Carolina, Georgia and north Florida are in near peak production pumping out a lot of volume. Quality varies a great deal from region to region, even the southern pepper has some issues from all the weather this fall. Cooler temperatures are moving in this week which could finally end the season for a lot of northern regions and some local deals in the mid-Atlantic. Cooler weather in the south will help the quality and slow production.

Transitions:
Green Bell Pepper is transitioning to the southeast.

Peak Seasons:
Green Bell Pepper is in Peak availability.

Bell Peppers (Western)

Orange Bell Peppers – light supply being harvested in Fresno. Showing good quality and condition.

Yellow Bell Peppers – light supply being harvested in Fresno. Yellow bell peppers are showing good quality and condition. With lighter supply and increasing demand, we could see a slight increase in the Yellow Bell Market.

Green Bell Peppers – lighter supply of green bell peppers being harvested in the Fresno growing area. Green bell peppers are showing good quality and condition on all sizes. With lighter supply and increasing demand, we could see a slight increase in the Green Bell Market.

Red Bell Peppers – good volume of red bell peppers still being harvested in the Fresno growing area. Red bell peppers are showing good quality and condition on all sizes.

Berries (Blackberries)

Blackberry supplies are slowly starting to improve. Domestic harvest continues to be limited as we finish up the season, but Mexican production is increasing and helping to fill the gaps. The first Mexican harvest did have some red cell and soft berries, but the quality is improving week over week. Fruit is crossing in Texas, and we have good availability in McAllen if that is a loading option for you. Otherwise, fruit is being transferred to other loading locations in California, and we may experience an occasional delay on arrival. Market prices have been consistent with opportunities buys in Texas.

Berries (Blueberries)

Blueberry supplies are gradually improving as more import fruit arrives. Peru, Argentina, and Central Mexico are all producing on a regular basis with regular arrivals landing on the east and west coasts. 4.4oz, 6oz, and Pints will be available. Quality is being reported as excellent on all the new import fruit. Good color, size, and flavor. We have several loading locations to choose from. Market prices are starting to decline as volume increases. Volume buys are available with aggressive prices being offered.

Transitions:
Chilean fruit is expected to arrive mid November.

Peak Seasons:
Peru and Argentina are expected to be in peak harvest over the next 3-4 weeks.

Berries (Raspberries)

Raspberry supplies slowed down slightly in the front part of this week due to rain delays from Mexico late last week. However, production has resumed, and we expect the Mexican fruit to be consistently crossing moving forward. We continue to have domestic harvest in Watsonville and Santa Maria, but this volume is tapering off quickly. Despite the slight setback earlier this week, we will continue to have good supplies. Quality on the Mexican product is being reported as strong. Market prices have been steady in all areas.

Berries (Strawberries)

Not much change this week on strawberries. We expect to have a consistent harvest in all major growing regions. The weather forecasts call for generally mild temperatures throughout the day and cool nights for the next 4-5 days. Quality overall has improved, and markets have been steady to slightly lower. Salinas / Watsonville berries have firmed up, and quality seems to have improved, but the berries are smaller in size. Depending on how the weather cooperates in this area, we expect to have production for the next 4-6 weeks. Santa Maria and Oxnard have slightly larger berries with good color. Again, if the weather cooperates, we expect to see improved quality and volume in these areas moving forward. Mexico is just starting to scratch at harvest this week. We will get better information on quality as more fruit crosses.

Transitions:
Mexico is just starting harvest this week. We expect supplies to improve over the next 2-4 weeks. Santa Maria and Oxnard are increasing harvest.

Broccoli

The broccoli market and supplies vary from shipper to shipper. Santa Maria continues to have the most competitive prices out West. Although quality is still showing problems from the heat-related weather. We are seeing yellowing, pin rot, brown bead, hollow core due to the heat. The same quality issues have been showing up upon arrivals with the value added broccoli as well. The supplies out of Mexico remain steady with the markets doing the same. They have been quoting hollow core as well.

Brussels Sprouts

We have seen improvement in quality as well as a full array of sizes in the brussel sprout arena. Supplies although have remained relatively limited which has kept the market at much higher than normal levels. Supplies should increase over the next couple of weeks. Hopefully, we will see some relief in the markets as well.

Carrots

Jumbo carrots prices are starting to react upward as a result of the extreme heat over the summer in the Central Valley. Expect this to continue through the end of the year. Rainbow carrots should be back in early to mid-November. Markets remain steady on other carrot items.

Cauliflower

The cauliflower market is trending higher with some suppliers and steady with others. Supplies are also following this same pattern. Quality has been better with minimal arrivals of bruising / brown discoloration. We are seeing white color with minimal cream to yellow color. Although the market looks to trend higher next week with supplies diminishing as we enter the end of the season for the Salinas Valley.

Celery

This market is stronger, especially on large sizing with most shippers. Smaller sizing currently is more readily available. Oxnard has begun production. Michigan weather is changing, and production has slowed down. This region is just about finished. Production in Santa Maria and Salinas is moderate. Demand is being met.Expect supplies to tighten up weekly as we head into November. Defects include slight bowing and seeder has been seen but minimally in northern as well as southern California. Overall quality in all the growing region continues to be good.

Chili Peppers

Chili pepper volume remains light out of our growing areas. Baja will be mostly done in the next few weeks, and Santa Maria is also struggling to produce any real volume. This will continue to be the case until we transition to Northern Mexico in late October or early November. Demand remains strong; with supplies down, the market is getting stronger. Very light volume on Anaheim peppers to nearly non existent. Mostly #2 Anaheim available at this time.

Cilantro

The cilantro market varies depending on the loading location. The Salinas suppliers are much higher than Santa Maria, Oxnard, or Mexico. The Salinas season is finishing here in the next 3 to 4 weeks. Santa Maria and Oxnard have improved quality and competitive prices. Mexico is also in better shape with supplies. Quality is showing full bunches and minimal yellowing.

Citrus (Lemons)

The Oxnard/Ventura crop is 97% harvested and nearing its seasonal end. Fruit out of this district is peaking on 165's and smaller. The Desert crop is going with limited volume that will build in availability as we move through October. Fruit from this district is peaking on 140s/115s, heavier to the fancy grade. Imported fruit from Chile and Mexico is in good supplies.

Citrus (Limes)

Lime quality levels continue to improve slowly. Tropical Storm Franklin and other storms had caused a lot of damage to the new crop lime supply and quality. Quality defects range from stylar, skin breakdown, and wind scarring. The size curve is changing to be lighter on the 110s, and 150s and right now all sizes are virtually priced the same. Supplies and demand are equal at this time. The market is steady.

Citrus (Oranges) Alert

California Valencia season is complete. Navel crop is just beginning with very limited volume to start for the week of October 23rd. Volume will build slowly over the next 3 to 4 weeks as more shippers start and more fruit colors and becomes ready to pick. Demand will exceed supplies until all shippers are up to full production and the supply line begins to fill.

Alerts:
Demand exceeds supplies.

Cucumbers (Eastern) Alert

Cooler temperatures are moving across the East slowing production and ending most of the shipping deals in the northern regions of the country. New Jersey, Canada, and New York State are the largest northern deals still producing, but all should wind up this weekend. Georgia is producing fair volume but the yields in Georgia and north Florida down due to hurricane Irma. A couple of growers in southwest Florida have started this week with light volume and fair quality.

Alerts:
There is a wide range in quality on cucumbers in the south.

Peak Seasons:
Cucumbers are moving out of peak season.

Cucumbers (Western)

Cucumber volume from Baja remains steady. Quality out of Baja remains mostly good. Cucumber volume has increased out of Nogales, from Sonora, Mexico. The market has adjusted down and may continue to do so as volume increases from the Northern Sonora growing region. Nogales quality is good. Cucumbers will be a promotable commodity with overlapping seasons from Baja and Nogales producing heavily.

Eggplant (Eastern) Alert

There is a stronger eggplant market in the east. Most northern growing regions have finished for the season and demand for southern eggplant has increased. Cooler weather moving through the east will slow production for the rest of the week. Most shippers in Georgia have had very good quality, and the demand for those eggplant has been very good. After a week of slumping prices expect the market to be higher for the rest of the week.

Alerts:
Production is going to slow down this week.

Transitions:
Eggplant is transitioning to the Southeast.

Peak Seasons:
Eggplant moving out of Peak availability.

Eggplant (Western)

Eggplant production out of Fresno remains light. We should remain to see light supply until the end of the California Eggplant Season. Quality out of Fresno remains mostly good. Nogales, from Mexico, is still light volume. Production is heavy to smaller fruit in both growing areas (24 count and smaller). The Western market remains steady. Quality from Fresno and Nogales are good to Excellent at this time.

Grapes (Green)

Green grapes continue along steadily. Prices are steady. Quality remains very nice. Barring weather we expect more of the same in quality.

Grapes (Red)

Red grapes also continue along with steady markets and great quality. Expect more of the same for the coming week.

Green Onions

Supplies have ramped up, and as a result, we are finally seeing jumbo sized green onions. Quality is really nice with green tops and minimal yellowing. The market is finally at normal levels on both iced and iceless packs.

Kale

The kale market remains competitive. Supplies are abundant with little disruption as we head into transition to Yuma. Quality has been excellent with full bunches, dark green color, minimal yellowing, and no dehydration.

Lettuce Iceberg

This market continues to gain strength. Demand exceeds supplies. Huron began production on Monday on lettuce. Leaf is expected to start next week. The weights on lettuce initially have been averaging 42-46 pounds. Production in Salinas and Santa Maria has been very limited. Defects that have been seen include tip burn, mechanical, puffiness, ribbing, and slight insect damage. The weights on palletized has been averaging 42-45 pounds. Processors continue to attempt to purchase as much acreage as possible. Expect strong markets for the entire week.

Transitions:
Huron began production on Monday.

Lettuce Leaf

Romaine continues to be active. Romaine hearts are also stronger in the marketplace with most suppliers. Supplies will be moderate to light the entire week. Salinas is expected to have production for another four weeks. Huron will have some production in a limited way in another week or two. Santa Maria will have light harvesting for the week. Processors continue to purchase as much acreage as possible on romaine. Defects on romaine include slight mechanical, pink ribbing and insect. Green and red leaf as well as butter are stronger as well but not nearly in comparison to romaine. Defects on green and red leaf as well as butter consist of slight insect damage, mechanical and fringe burn. Expect moderate supplies on all leaf items except romaine for the week.

Lettuce Tender Leaf Alert

As we finish the Salinas Valley season, raw product supplies of spring mix, baby spinach, arugula, and the other components of spring mix have decreased significantly. Quality is also a major factor as crews battle mildew to heat damage with the existing acreage. Although Yuma has started in a light way with harvesting, it isn't enough volume to meet demands. Also as an industry, we are seeing price increase with some suppliers due to the shortage of raw product. This will trend until we transition to Yuma in four weeks.

Alerts:
Raw product has become a serious factor as poor quality acreage is resulting in a decrease in supplies. Some shippers have raised prices as a result.

Melon (Cantaloupe)

The desert has started and is slowly building volume. Fruit is peaking on large sizes in all areas with no 18's being harvested and scarce amounts of 15's coming in sporadically. Offshore supplies are set to start the first week or two of November. We are experiencing good demand and supplies that are less than last week. Quality out of the desert is outstanding while quality in the San Joaquin Valley is still very nice. In the SJV a few lots have come in with some soft melons, but overall they are great still. The market is higher.

Transitions:
The desert has started. We have a couple more weeks of harvesting in the San Joaquin Valley. Offshore lopes are set to arrive the first week or two of November.

Melon (Honeydew)

Honeydews are continuing to see a little more demand. The overall supply of honeydews is lower as growers finish harvesting for their season. Quality has remained excellent. The desert has started in a light way with building volumes, Mexico has also started. The market is higher.

Transitions:
The desert has started. Offshore supplies are set to arrive during the middle to end of November.

Melon (Watermelon)

Watermelon supply out of California remains light. Quality is being reported at fair to good. Volume on new crop watermelon in Nogales crossing from Mexico has increased. More Nogales shippers have started to received steady volume on this commodity. This should have an impact on the market. Demand is very strong, mostly due to a lack of supply from older fields in competing districts. Quality on Mexican watermelons is mostly good to excellent

Onions Alert

Onion market continues to be fairly steady on all colors and most sizes. Medium Yellow onions are plentiful with most shippers making deals to keep the volume moving. The Idaho growers had temperatures drop down to 23 to 26 degrees on Saturday and Sunday nights which put an all the growers on full alert. Reports of damage so far are minimal. I don't think we will know the real story till these onions come out of storage. So stay tuned. Rain is in the forecast going into the weekend. Growers are trying to get everything into the barn by next week, but the rain could slow things down a bit. Transportation is still very limited out the Northwest and is demanding a premium. Christmas tree are right around the corner so watch out for transportation to get even tighter. Stay ahead of your inventories.

Alerts:
Transportation is very limited.

Pears

Stockton, California – Bartlett pears are steady on all sizes with 110s and larger. California should continue shipping mountain fruit through this month. Red pears are steady and continue to peak on 45/50 half cartons, but supplies remain limited. Bosc pears are still peaking on 100/110s, and the market continues to slowly fall. The quality has been good for Bartletts, red pears, and Bosc.

Washington – Bartlett pears are steady on all sizes. Bartletts are peaking on 110/120s, but packing has been light. Red Bartlett/Red Sensations are steady and are still peaking on 45/50 half cartons. Bosc and D'anjous are lower on most sizes as more shippers have gotten started. Both the Bosc and D'anjous are large now with peak sizing in the 80/90/100 range. The quality for all varieties has been good.

New York – they continue to pack bushel, bin, and tote Bosc and the market is steady. The quality is reported as good.

Peak Seasons:
Washington continues in the peak of its Bartlett pear season.

Pineapples

We continue to see good supplies coming in for the tropics. Expect good supplies as we move through November. Size is peaking on 5ct/6ct with the smaller sizes limited.

Potatoes Alert

Idaho potato growers are getting close to being finished with the 2017/2018 potato crop. Mother nature brought some cold temperatures into the region the tail end of last week through the weekend. These cold temperatures stopped most grower from harvesting. Growers, for the most part, will not harvest potatoes till the core temperature of the potato hits 45 degrees. On Thursday and Friday of last week, growers did not start harvesting till 2 p.m. and ran well into the night. Parts of Idaho received a few inches of snow on Saturday which was all but gone by the end of the day. The forecast is calling for favorable weather till Friday which is calling for a chance of light rain clearing by Saturday. Markets are unstable as the harvest come slowly to an end, weather interruptions and supplies coming out of storage not being ready. Supplies that are making it to the packing sheds are peaking on 60 count and larger. Deals are being made to keep supplies of large carton moving. Most supplies of 80 count and smaller that are coming off the lines are going right into the retail bags. Transportation is very limited with no relief in sight. Christmas trees are right around the corner, look for truck to tighten up even more.

Alerts:
Transportation very limited

Potatoes (colored)

Eastern Washington – red and gold potatoes remain steady, but supplies are light. The quality has been good.

Western Washington – reds, whites, and golds are steady with good availability. All are peaking on number-one A size and the quality has been good.

Bakersfield, California – red, white, and gold potatoes are steady on all sizes. The availability has been good, but transportation from Washington has been tough. All colors have been good quality.

Idaho – red and gold potatoes are steady to lower with good availability. The quality has been good for both.

Wisconsin – red potatoes are slightly higher this week while golds are steady, the availability for both is good. Trucks are slightly easier here. The quality has been good.

North Dakota – reds and golds are steady with good availability. Transportation has been the toughest thing to find up there. The quality is good.

Peak Seasons:
North Dakota, Wisconsin, Idaho, and western Washington continue in the peak of their red and gold potato seasons.

Squash (Eastern) Alert

Light Eastern Squash Supplies will push the market up some in the East. Heavy supplies from Mexico are keeping the market in check. Weather issue from storms and above average temperatures, coupled with insect problems have hurt southern crops, especially yellow squash. Quality on green squash has been good and most yellow squash has been decent, but supplies are going to get much tighter for the rest of the week. A few shippers in central Florida started this week with light supplies, but there will not be much volume for a couple of weeks.

Alerts:
Light Eastern supply

Peak Seasons:
Squash is moving out of peak availability in the east.

Squash (Western)

Italian, Yellow S/N and Grey squash are currently being Harvested in Sonora Mexico and crossing through Nogales. Heavy supply crossing through Nogales has exceeded demand. Good quality and condition are being reported on these three squash commodities.

Stone Fruit

Most of the traditional stone fruits are done with harvest for the season. Nectarines are finished. A few can be found here and there. Most growers should be done with peaches this week and next week. Some growers will be wrapping up plums this week. Other growers are anticipating having plums through November. Apple pears, pomegranates, and persimmons are in full swing now. Please consider using these on your menus. California kiwi has started. Prices are adjusting as more growers are in with volume.

Transitions:
Kiwi has started in California.

Peak Seasons:
Peaches and nectarines will be finishing up over the next week to ten days.

Tomatoes (Eastern)

As the seasonal change introduces cooler temperatures into the eastern growing areas, Fall tomato programs have begun to wind down in the Carolinas, Tennessee, and Virginia. The last flush of fruit for the season was observed in the markets last week with Larger fruit showing the best value for the dollar, and already this week's markets have returned to traditional price structure with larger fruit offered at a premium compared against the smaller sizes available. Low demand for tomatoes is helping to keep the market from taking off but has shown a slight increase of 2-3 dollars this week already. With November fast approaching, northern operations will finish in the next 1 to 2 weeks transitioning harvests into Quincy and Palmetto/Ruskin districts of Florida where Hurricane Irma has been responsible for reducing most of the planted acreage of the season. It is not known how much, if any, of the available tomato crops, will be offered from this area that has not been committed to contract programs already. Pricing is expected to continue an upward trend this month, and November is still a bit of an unknown. Though we have not experienced the market reacting as quickly as expected following post-Irma reports, largely due to Mexico helping to meet US National demand in recent weeks, there is still the consensus of a potential supply gap through November and possibly early December.

Tomatoes (Western)

Pricing is still reasonable for the season out of California although the quality is showing multiple months of summer heat and is considered secondary compared to Eastern counterparts. California Roma tomatoes have already begun their seasonal decline. However, supply is steady with increasing crossings from Mexico into Texas. While California fruit quality has been reported fair at best, Mexico has begun in recent weeks shipping good quality tomatoes helping overall supply as California growers wrap up. Grape and cherry tomato production remains light against rising demand pressing prices upward. Over the next week to 10 days, domestic yields will diminish further to a halt continuing the upward pressure in the market that has set in this week with the speculation of elevated pricing until December when winter programs start.





hello

Web Mail:

Follow Us:

 © GALYMA